At NRG soil health and conservation are our foundation. And we support these practices by cover cropping. We offer special mixtures of clovers, cereal grains, annual ryegrass and more. Not because we can’t make up our minds — but because we know your land is different from your neighbor’s. And if we don’t have something for your land, we’ll make it. Easy as that.

Learn more by talking to a cover crop expert at NRG, or by viewing our online brochure below (also available as a PDF download).

Maintain Your Soil’s Full Potential

Purple Top Turnip

This turnip variation delivers nutrients back into the soil. The globe roots take about 55 days to reach maturity, dying come December. They may live until spring in the case of a mild winter but are easy to terminate.

Dwarf Essex Rape

This cool-season brassica grows rapidly in the fall and makes a great alternative in crop rotations. The crop opens up the subsoil with a forked taproot and releases chemical compounds to help kill soil-borne pests and pathogens, including nematodes. This crop is a viable alternative to Tilth Pro Nitro Radish, when the seeding date is later in the year.

It’s the foundation that’s important. And when the weather strikes cool and dry, you’ve got to act fast before you lose valuable nutrients in your soil. Lucky for you, it’s easy to protect your land — just choose from a selection of cover crops from NRG Ag Services & Supply.

We have special mixtures of clovers, cereal grains, annual ryegrass and more. Not because we can’t make up our minds — but because we know your land is different from your neighbor’s. And if we don’t have something for your soils, we’ll make it. Easy as that.

Nitro Radish

With superior genetics and an aggressive-acting brassica taproot, Nitro Radish drills through compaction like it’s no more than butter. Once rooted deep, the radish crop recycles nutrients to improve your soil quality and economic crop production. When it dies in the winter, the plant decomposes and releases bio-active plant chemicals and nutrients.

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  • Germinates and grows quickly
  • Improves soil tilth
  • Develops a deep taproot
  • Recycles nutrients
  • Suppresses weeds
  • Improves water infiltration

White Ladino Clover

Growing a tad taller than typical white clover, white ladino clover produces a higher-quality forage with larger leaves and stems that work great for fall seeding or pastures. Grazed ladino white clover is highly digestible with high crude protein running about 28 percent.

Crimson Clover

A legume traditionally used as a forage in the Southern United States — is a rapidly-growing winter cover crop that works in a variety of rotations, including corn, soybeans, wheat, cotton, potatoes, snap beans and grain sorghum. Crimson clover is adapted to cool conditions and tolerates most soil types.

  • Fixates nitrogen
  • Improves soil quality
  • Suppresses weeds
  • Controls erosion
  • Attracts beneficial insects

Winter Rye

This cereal cover crop builds soil and scavenges nitrogen. Its massive foliate increases soil coverage, reduces foliar diseases and retains moisture during dry conditions. Due to its high carbon ratio, winter rye can increase organic matter and suppress weeds. Consider this crop when planting soybeans the following spring.

Barley

Barley is an overwintering cover crop used for erosion control, nutrient recycling and weed suppression. Barley is an excellent source of biomass, and its thick root system can help improve soil structure and water infiltration. It is also a drought-tolerant cover crop and can tolerate more alkaline soils than other cereal grains.

Oats

Oats work to prevent soil erosion, scavenge nitrogen and protect the soil — with minimal maintenance needed. Oats along with the Nitro Radish will grow quickly in the fall to help cover the soil surface and suppress weeds. When mixed with winter rye, turnips and clover, it can also be used for a high-quality forage for grazing.

Triticale

A cross between two cereal crops, winter rye and wheat, Triticale is a combination of drought tolerance and disease resistance. It is a high-quality forage that can be cut for hay or silage. And it not only benefits the soil, but it’s also an excellent crop for feeding beef or dairy cattle.

Austrian Winter Peas

Winter peas, like their name suggests, have good winter hardiness and are highly palatable for livestock forage. They can be planted in the fall for quick germination to provide effective weed suppression and biomass, and produce nitrogen.

TNT Vetch (Hairy Vetch)

Winter peas, like their name suggests, have good winter hardiness and are highly palatable for livestock forage. They can be planted in the fall for quick germination to provide effective weed suppression and biomass, and produce nitrogen.

KB Royal Annual Ryegrass

KB Royal annual ryegrasses scavenge nitrogen and promote nutrient cycling, which translates to bigger harvests and better profits. During dry seasons, annual ryegrass can contribute to larger yields with deep roots that create channels for crop roots to readily follow. Asset 15

  • Increased winter hardiness
  • Breaks up compacted soil
  • Improves soil health, organic matter and productivity
  • Scavenges available nitrogen, reducing the need for
    extra inputs
  • May reduce soybean cyst nematode pressure
  • Qualifies you for state and federal conservation incentives
  • Provides source for livestock forage

Alfalfa

Alfalfa is a perennial deep rooted legume. It is a great selection for hay production or grazing, and is one of the most high-quality forages available. When selecting an alfalfa, consider the DRI (disease rating index), WSI (winter survival index) and FD (fall dormancy) relative to your location.

  • Performs well in mixes or alone
  • Utilized by equine and livestock industry
  • Does best on well drained soils with high fertility

Orchard Grass

Orchard grass is a cool season bunch grass that is medium- to long-lived and performs best on well-drained soils. Early and late maturing varieties are available depending on if it is being used for hay production or grazing.

  • High yielding
  • High drought and shade tolerance
  • Winter hardy

Perennial Ryegrass

Perennial ryegrass is a fast establishing and palatable grass. It is a great choice for long-term use in grazing pastures or hay production.

  • Performs well under intensive grazing
  • Highly digestible
  • Does well on many different soil conditions

Fescue

Fescue is commonly used because of its versatility; it can be used for waterways, erosion control, forage, pastures, and lawns. The crop does well in areas with low fertility and is one of the most drought-resistant field grasses.

  • Relatively deep rooted
  • Be aware of the Endophyte Fungus when used for
    grazing animals
  • Performs well with legumes

Timothy

Timothy is a cool season perennial bunch grass. It is ideal for hay production, and performs well in pasture and waterway mixes.

  • Highly palatable
  • Preferred by horse industry
  • Matches well with other legumes

Forage Bluegrass

Forage Bluegrass is a cool season perennial grass. It is known for its performance in hay fields and pastures across the Midwest.

  • High forage quality
  • Early maturing
  • Tolerates intensive grazing
  • Performs/grows well in cooler weather
  • Needs to be used in a mix with other grasses

We have a variety of other cool and warm season grasses available. Please call for information on other seeds, so we can put together a mix that best suits your farm’s goals.

Multi-Purpose Crops

Buckwheat

  • Nitrogen scavenger
  • Soil builder
  • Weed suppressor
  • Rapid growth
  • Winter kill
  • Attracts pollinators and beneficial insects
  • 35-50 lbs/acre

Phacelia

  • Nitrogen scavenger
  • Rapid decomposition
  • Low C:N ratio
  • Attracts pollinators
  • Blooms April to July
  • 3 lbs/acre

Flax

  • Mobilizes phosphorous
  • Soil builder
  • Early maturing
  • Single tap root
  • Attracts beneficial insects
  • 20 lbs/acre

Cover Crop Options

NRG Ag Services & Supply has high-quality cover crop mixes to help your operation sustain and prosper even in the off season. Follow our recommended guidelines to find options for your farm, and then call a representative to discuss the details of the best cover crop mix for your fields.

These combinations of cover crops are very common in much of Indiana and the Midwest. You are not limited to these mixes. We can create any mix for you depending on your needs and farm goals.